Carandhelicopter

HeliMag

Gap GeoTek has developed an airborne high-resolution light-weight magnetics acquisition system. The Gap HeliMag system can be installed to any helicopter that is fitted with a tow hook.

The sensor is within a towed bird, and this configuration eliminates any aircraft effect on the data (hence no compensation is required). Highly accurate positioning and navigation make it suitable for quality DTM data. The helicopter’s superior contouring capability results in uniform data resolution. Minimal ferry is required due to the ability to base close to survey area. The system is ideal for remote areas where no airstrips are available.

Towedbird

Benefits

  • Magnetic field measured up to 9600 readings/sec. (<5cm. sample interval)
  • Increased data resolution due to helicopters ability to fly lower and slower than traditionally used fixed wing systems
  • High accuracy positioning & navigation - suitable for DTM data
  • Towed bird system - no aircraft effect on magnetic data (no real-time or post processed compensation required)
  • Quick data transfer from the field back to head office – same day preliminary grids available
  • Helicopters superior contouring capabilities - uniform data resolution
  • Minimal ferry due to ability to base close to survey area Ideal for remote areas where no airstrips are available
  • Digital video flight path available
  • Aircraft equipped with satellite tracking for flight following
  • Aircraft and support vehicle equipped with satellite phone and 2 way radio communications
  • Experienced survey pilots and field crew
  • Prompt system availability

Specifications

  • DGPS positioning accuracy of 10cm horizontally and 15cm vertically
  • Robinson R44 helicopter (turbine helicopter available on request)
  • Sensor height 30m AGL (helicopter 60 m AGL) 2 diurnal base station magnetometers
  • Support ground crew and vehicle
  • In-field data quality control

Helimag 2Helimag 3

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HeliMag

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